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Hiking the Little Wild Horse & Bell Canyon Loop

Hiking the Little Wild Horse & Bell Canyon Loop is easy to navigate, the trail is well marked, it's usually free of standing water, the canyon walls are just wide enough for you to fit through, you can drive to the trail head in a small, compact car (most slot canyon entrances require a 4X4 car to get to the TH), you can hike this within a few hours, and it's like a fun maze for kids and dogs.

Exploring the Yant Flat Cliffs, hike candy cliffs

The Yant Flat Cliffs is area is northwest of St. George down a dirt road that leads to a gorgeous view of red and orange rocks. This sandstone layer extends about 3 miles long at the southern boundary of a rocky plateau (Yant Flat), and the cliffs and buttes offer a variety of unusual striped rock formations. The wavy bands occur in shades of orange, red, pink, yellow, and white. Exploring the Yant Flat Cliffs (aka Candy Cliffs to locals) is relatively easy as you maneuver steep slopes across slickrock.

Hiking the Hidden Valley Trail, Moab

Hiking the Hidden Valley Trail right outside of Moab makes you feel like you are in a totally different place - look anywhere in Moab and the dominant sight is the Moab rim. It's known as "Behind the Rocks" - an interesting mix of sandstone fins, large rock walls, and domes. Is Hidden Valley really a valley? Not quite.  It's actually two hanging terraces that descends into Behind the Rocks and eventually widens into a 4-wheel drive road while a boot-beaten path detours along the base of a sandstone wall with petroglyphs.

Visiting Devil's Garden & Metate Arch, Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument

Devil's Garden is apart of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, and is home to Metate Arch as well as hoodoos. Not to be confused with The Devils Garden Loop Trail in Moab, this area is only 640 acres and is part of a Wilderness Study Area, for the purpose of possible wilderness designation; however, wilderness status was not recommended by the BLM back in 1991. One of the reasons state was that the existing roads, parking lot, picnic tables, and port-a-potty are all in close proximity to a natural area. The second reason was the likelihood of several groups of people coming to this area at the same time to the same formations (all of which are within a 2 minute walk from the trailhead). Both of those reasons diminish the wilderness experience of solitude.

The Best Dog Friendly Waterfalls Hikes in Utah

Ready to learn about the BEST Dog Friendly Waterfall Hikes in Utah?

I've complied all of them into one post - no more researching, asking around, or spending hours looking at AllTrails. All of these listed are dog-friendly (off leash) of course, and are separated by location. There are not ranked in any order. Click the link for each hike to learn more, to see all the trail stats (distance, elevation gain, etc), and to view a trail map. Directions are also provided for each hike.

Hiking The Fisher Towers, MoabThe Fisher Towers Trail is located 16 miles North East of Moab, Utah, and offers a 4 mile (RT) hike that winds through these fin-like structures. The Fisher Towers are composed of Moenkopi and Cutler sandstone, and have eroded into many shapes and sizes. These towers are one of the most outstanding scenic features of Utah's Colorado Riverway, as the rock pinnacles soar above a maze of red and pink hued canyon, and overlook the Colorado River, Onion Creek, and the famous rock "Priest & Nuns" to the south.

Hiking Mary Jane Slot Canyon, Moab

Mary Jane Slot Canyon is one of Moab's hidden gems - the "trail" is a creek the entire way, which leads to a 30 ft waterfall. This is a great trail to do when Moab is too hot, and you, the dogs, or kids need to cool off. The canyon walls get higher as you hike further into the canyon, and eventually will reach upwards of 100 ft! There are several side canyons that allow for exploring tighter slot canyons.

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